Friday, September 30, 2016

The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee

  • THE BOOK
    • The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee
    • Published August 30, 2016
    • Author's debut novel

  • THE PREMISE
    • In Manhattan in 2118 there is a 1000-story building that covers many blocks. (For comparison, the original World Trade towers were each about 110 stories while the current tower is 104.)
    • This is a young adult novel featuring characters about 17-18 years old.
    • One genetically perfect girl lives in the 1000th floor penthouse and is in love with a boy she can't have. Another girl who lives "up-tower" is a drug addict who loves the same boy. A third up-tower girl experiences a circumstance change that takes her down tower.
    • And then there are the characters who live down the tower. The floors in the 100s and 200s are practically considered slums.
    • The main characters are named Avery, Eris, Leda, Atlas, Watt, Cord, Mariel and Rylin. 
      • Three of those come straight from Greek mythology. Isn't that kind of a high percentage?
    • In the prologue chapter one girl is falling to her death from the top of the tower so it's a mystery of sorts.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • Nowhere on the book itself does it tell you that this is the first book of a trilogy. If I had known that going in I might have waited until they were all out first.
    • But the fact that this will be a trilogy means that it explains the book's biggest issue: no real plot other than "who jumps or fell or gets pushed" off the tower. 
    • Most of the reviews I perused all described this as a combination of Gossip Girl and Pretty Little Liars. I have neither read nor watched the TV programs based on them so I couldn't tell you if this is correct from personal experience.
    • This type of story generally seems to take place on a spaceship or generational interstellar space station. There are always haves and have-nots and there is always a class system. There are always lower class teens hooking up with upper class teens. These are always the tropes that go along with this type of story.
      • This is in a self-contained building rather than a spaceship. 
      • The characters can and do leave the building on occasion as apparently the rest of the world is still the same.
    • The world-building could be better because I could never quite picture how things fit together. 
      • As an example, using characters from a non-illustrated book, take Jamie and Claire from the Outlander books. Author Diana Gabaldon describes Jamie and Claire in great detail. Interestingly, my version will not necessarily look like anyone else's version --- imaginations are such individual things --- but we can all easily picture them in our mind's eye.
      • The same should be true of a 1000-story building and its layout. Perhaps that is not the focus of a book aimed at teens (Diana G. was certainly writing for adults and she had hundreds of pages to include descriptions) but it's a new type of locale and the descriptions should be easier to picture.
      • Plus we never understand why or how a thousand floor building became possible. Again, this is a book aimed at teen girls so heaven forfend they are given the nuts and bolts of building construction or its history...yes, pun intended.
    • I enjoyed this until the very end when I realized it would be at least another two years before the story completes.
      • I'm never a fan of stories where the characters sole being is based on the boy they like and/or how much money they have. These are all characters about to finish school and I don't recall a single instance of what they plan to do once school is over with the exception of the two "poor" kids. Hmph.
        • As a high school junior/senior I was all about college and planning my future as well as liking boys. 
    • Recommended for teen girls who want nothing to do with how a building --- or gravity --- works.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer

  • THE BOOK
    • The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer
    • Published August 16, 2016
    • First book by author
    • Known for stand-up comedy, contestant on "Last Comic Standing", Comedy Central show "Inside Amy Schumer", and last summer's film "Trainwreck".

  • THE PREMISE
    • Like almost every book by a celebrity who's considered funny, this is a book of essays about the author's life.
    • Topics include her childhood, her college years, her decade of toiling as a stand-up comic before getting her own TV show, her sexual experiences, her family and several others.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • If you like Amy Schumer's comic sensibilities you will likely enjoy much of her book. It's not always a laugh riot as she covers some fairly serious topics but the funny parts made me laugh. 
    • I enjoy her TV show so I thought I would like her book and I did.
      • She comes off as relatable in that you start to imagine that you could be best friends with her if you ever meet in person.
      • She considers herself an introvert who needs time away from people; she hates parties; she's bawdy; she enjoys wine and food; etc...
        • Me too! Let's be pals, Amy! (OK, I don't like wine but my friends do!)
        • But of course, that's one of Amy's points: we don't generally meet celebs and even if we do they already have their own friends (as do I).
    • And if you don't like Amy Schumer or female comedians in general, well then, DON'T READ THE BOOK. You may even pretend it doesn't exist. No need to waste time on people's books if you don't like them.
      • Apparently there was a campaign by one or more persons who gave her book low reviews on Amazon.com just because they HATE Amy Schumer.
      • Life is too short for me to waste on people I don't like. I am not a fan of "hate watching" either (or hate reading, in this case).
    • Recommended for fans of Amy Schumer.

Friday, September 23, 2016

The Last One by Alexandra Oliva

  • THE BOOK
    • The Last One by Alexandra Oliva
    • Published July 12, 2016
    • Debut novel

  • THE PREMISE
    • Twelve contestants are cast on an extreme reality show.
      • The game has elements of the TV show "Survivor" but is much more brutal and not nearly as structured.
    • The contestants can quit at any time by using a specific Latin phrase. The winner will be the final contestant after 11 have quit, however long it takes. 
      • They start off with team challenges and will segue into the individual challenges after a few days.
    • Each contestant is referred to by a nickname bestowed by the producer, giving a window on each character's TV "narrative". 
      • "Survivor" does this by editing the footage to create "heroes" and "villains" for each season.
      • The main character is called Zoo because she loves animals (or worked with them, I forget). There are also Rancher, Cheerleader Boy, Asian Chick (who becomes Carpenter Chick after she shows her skills during the competition), Waitress, Engineer, Biology, Air Force, Black Doctor, Tracker, Banker and Exorcist.
    • The story has two threads: one following the competition from the start and the other following Zoo about 3 weeks later as the game continues.
    • From the prologue chapter the reader knows that a deadly pandemic will strike the outside world in about 3 days, killing off millions of people, including the Host, the producer and the cameramen. The contestants are convinced this is all part of the game.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • I really liked this book and it's "reality show meets the apocalypse" storyline. That said, I would have liked to see the whole thing play out without the deadly disease portion.
      • You get to know the characters from the beginning and it would have been fun to see who thrived and who fell by the wayside without the randomness of the virus killing off people at random.
    • Zoo convinces herself of some rather crazy scenarios but you can see how she might do so, given how realistic TV shows make things seem today.
    • Recommended for those who like apocalyptic fiction and outdoor-based reality shows.
    • I don't get the sense that this is a continuing series so I am pretty sure this is a standalone novel. That earns many points from me these days.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Childhood Flashback: Mushroom Planet #1 by Eleanor Cameron

  • THE BOOK
    • The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet by Eleanor Cameron
    • Published in 1954
    • Other books by author include 4 more Mushroom Planet sequels, the 5-book Julia Redfern series and several more.
    • The Eleanor Cameron Award for Middle Grades is given annually for excellence in Children's science fiction.

  • THE PREMISE
    • David's father shows him an ad in the newspaper placed by a Mr. Bass who is looking for a boy or two between the ages of 8 and 11 who can build him a spaceship.
    • David and his best friend Chuck build a spaceship and are tasked by Mr. Bass to fly to Basidium-X, a small planet invisible to the naked eye located in Earth's orbit. The boys need to find out what's wrong with the inhabitants of Basidium-X and help solve their problem, whatever it may be.
    • Spoiler alert: they succeed. 

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • I first read this book as a child, most likely a Scholastic Books version. 
      • Scholastic Books is a great thing for a kid. You go through the flier and make a wish list of all the things you want to read and then ask your parents if you can order anything.
      • My parents were great: we could order almost everything we wanted!
        • It was almost embarrassing on the day the book order arrived because only a small handful of kids would have ordered books and would usually get a single book or maybe two. My pile was 10 or 12 books!
        • By the time my son was in school in the late 1990s and 2000s there was too much emphasis on computer games and trinkets but I also let him order whatever he wanted in the way of books.
    • I loved this book as a child. As an adult I still like it. It's sweet and captures the imagination of children who believe in the impossible.
      • The author wrote it at the request of her 8-year-old son David who wanted her to write a story with him in it. Thus I think the target audience are kids between 8 and 11. Today it might even skew a bit younger, perhaps 5 to 10.
    • Except for David's mother there are no other females of note in the story with the exception of the chicken, Mrs. Pennyfeather. Her rooster husband is named John. Heaven forfend that Mrs. Pennyfeather has a name of her own!
      • As a girl I would have taken this in stride: girls weren't astronauts! Even chickens were only defined by their husbands' names! (It's called casual sexism and was rampant until...oh wait, it's STILL rampant.)
      • But I loved --- and still love --- science fiction at least as much as my two brothers did! Who were my female role models in science fiction in the 1960s? Judy and Penny Robinson in "Lost in Space"? (Yes, definitely, but their little brother Will got all the focus.) Uhura in "Star Trek"? (Also yes as Uhura is awesome.) Meg Murry in A Wrinkle in Time? (Yep.)
    • Eleanor Cameron died 20 years ago. She was born in 1912 and died at the age of 84. I am not truly coming down on her in particular for the lack of female protagonists; it was the way of the world in science fiction.
      • It's funny to realize this as an adult, that almost every science fiction book I ever read and loved as a kid is male-centric.
    • For whatever reason I never read the 4 sequels but they are on their way via inter-library loan as I type. Stay tuned!
    • I never read or even knew about the author's Julia Redfern books, a series about a young girl who wants to be a writer. Apparently they are semi-autobiographical but they aren't science fiction. My library has all 5 so I will request those too. 
    • I would recommend this book to young children, ages 5 to 10, who like adventure stories that take place in space.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

A History of Britain #3 by Simon Schama

  • THE BOOK
    • A History of Britain: The Fate of Empire 1776-2000 by Simon Schama
    • Published December 18, 2002
    • Other works by author include A History of Britain, parts 1 and 2; Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution; Rough Crossings; and The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words, 1000 BCE-1492 CE. Part 2 of The Story of the Jews will be published in October 2016.
    • He has also hosted several BBC TV shows on history which sometimes air in the United States on PBS. I watched "The Story of the Jews" in 2013 and "A History of Britain" in 2000.

  • THE PREMISE
    • Between 1776 and 2000 Great Britain developed an empire and lost an empire.
      • It is still possible that Scotland might break away from the United Kingdom or that Northern Ireland might reunite with the Ireland. It is also possible that neither of these things will happen.
    • Britain had control of the American colonies (the U.S.), Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, Hong Kong, Iraq, Palestine (Israel), Egypt, South Africa, Jamaica, Belize, Guyana, Ghana, Fiji, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Qatar, Cyprus, Pakistan, Yemen, Zambia, Tanzania, Botswana, Nigeria, Malta, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saint Vincent & the Grenadines, Sierra Leone, Myanmar, United Arab Emirates, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Brunei, Uganda, Barbados, Falkland Islands, Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Nauru, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Kenya, Sudan, Gambia, Trinidad & Tobago, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Bahamas, Antigua & Barbuda, Saint Lucia, Ireland, Lesotho, Dominica, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Swaziland, Grenada and parts of Antarctica.
      • A handful of these are now part of the Commonwealth with Queen Elizabeth II as the head of state, but each are individual nations in all other respects.
    • This book tells the story of how the Empire was created and the reasons it all fell apart.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • According to my Good Reads records I apparently started reading this book last year and then put it down while I wallowed in a multitude of library books. My library queue is at a standstill right now so I had time to pick this book up again. I have already read the first two books in the series and they have since been donated for others to read.
    • It was interesting to see how decisions made up to 150 years ago have created repercussions felt up to the current day. Some of these decisions were made after the world wars.
      • Changing the fuel of the navy from coal (which Britain has much of) to oil (which the middle East has much of) during World War I caused the Middle East to get carved up to suit the Empire, thus keeping the oil flowing.
      • The Irish really just wanted "Home Rule" whereby Irish governed the Irish while Britain took care of foreign policy. The prime ministers and ruling aristocracy (Protestants) chose to deny this request (WWI didn't help) because the Catholic majority might mess things up for the ruling class. 
      • In India the British took over from the East India Company after the Indian Rebellion of 1857.
        • One cause of the rebellion --- the last straw for the Indian soldiers --- was the fact that rifle cartridges needed to be greased with fat and bitten into to load them. Muslims don't eat pork and Hindus don't eat beef. But the cartridges were rumored to be covered in pork and beef fat (rather than acceptable mutton fat or beeswax). The British officers dismissed the soldiers complaints.
      • The racist attitudes of the times often dictated how the "natives" were treated: as untoward children who needed the British Empire to take care of them. In most cases this was due to skin color but the Irish Catholics were also treated this way. It was racism combined with arrogance and superiority.
        • Indians would, for example, obtain a British education (only the boys, of course) but then still be barred from the best jobs. They couldn't rise any farther than lowly clerk, say.
        • Another fun tactic was to forbid or undercut an industry, then tax the people who now couldn't afford to pay because they had no jobs.
          • The cotton fabric (calico) that India was famous for was undersold by cheap fabric made in England which the Indians were now expected to buy.
          • Salt was forbidden to be processed in India unless it was purchased from British imports. Mohandas Gandhi led the salt march in 1930 and the excessive salt taxes weren't repealed until 1947.
        • During times of famine the British leaders expected the starving Irish or Indians to stand on their own two feet or pull themselves up by their bootstraps or some such pithy saying. For a variety of reasons this was not generally possible.
    • There was an interesting focus on certain people of the Empire --- the usual suspects including Queen Victoria and Winston Churchill, for example --- but on occasion this was especially helpful.
      • One example is Eric Blair, who wrote under the pen name George Orwell, got an extensive narrative. This was helpful for me to see exactly where he was coming from when he wrote Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four.
    • The book wraps up pretty quickly once World War II ends with just an overview of the creation of social programs after the war and their subsequent dismantling by Margaret Thatcher's government. The influx of immigrants from former Empire countries has an impact on Great Britain still felt today (the book was published in 2002).
    • Recommended for those who like history, especially of Great Britain. It is a long (over 500 pages), detailed book but I think it is the best of the three volumes because it explains so much of what goes on in the world today.
      • The author's style is not one of date, date, fact, and date. He really tells the story behind the dates and facts. He assumes you probably already know the facts and dates actually (it was written more for the British audience than an American one naturally) and as a student of the subject I mainly do know the gist if not the details.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

American Heiress by Jeffrey Toobin

  • THE BOOK
    • American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst by Jeffrey Toobin
    • Published August 2, 2016
    • Other works by author include The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court, The Run of His Life: The People vs O.J. Simpson (I read this one; my review here) and Too Close to Call: The Thirty-Six-Day Battle to Decide the 2000 Election. He is also a correspondent for CNN.

  • THE PREMISE
    • Nineteen-year-old Patricia Hearst, heiress to a portion of the fortune built by her grandfather William Randolph Hearst, was kidnapped by members of the Symbionese Liberation Army from her Berkeley apartment in February 1974. 
    • Instead of asking for ransom the SLA asked for food distribution to the poor of Oakland and San Francisco.
    • Meanwhile, Patricia joined the SLA as "Tania" and committed crimes with them.
    • After over a year on the run she was arrested, tried and convicted of bank robbery.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • Though the author was unable to secure the participation of Patricia herself, he used her book and other sources to tell her side of the story.
    • She was targeted because her engagement announcement appeared in the paper the month before and a member of the SLA saw it. She was living with her boyfriend and her parents were anxious for her to get married so she would no longer be living in sin.
      • Patricia's fiance was one of her teachers when she was in high school. She never saw him again after the night she was kidnapped.
    • I moved to California, specifically the Bay Area, with my family in the summer of 1974 so I remember this being in the newspapers and on the TV news all the time.
    • The food distribution turned into a fiasco.
      • Patricia's father, Randolph, did not have the ready cash available for the costs. If I understand it correctly, the Hearst family money is in a trust and each member is entitled to a specific share, doled out by the trust. While it is certainly plenty of money --- we should all be so lucky to have a share of the Hearst trust --- Randolph didn't have the $2,000,000 (about $10 million in today's money) to cover the costs so the Hearst trust made up the difference, especially once the SLA demanded even more.
      • Huge crowds gathered for the free food and the predictable violence broke out.
      • Sara Jane Moore, future attempted assassin of Gerald Ford in 1975, worked as a bookkeeper for the project and Jim Jones, founder and leader of the People's Temple cult, offered his group's help in the distribution. He was turned down.
    • Was Patricia Hearst guilty of joining the SLA of her own free will or was she brainwashed, a victim of Stockholm Syndrome, where the captive begins to identify with the captors? (Sort of spoilery but it happened over 40 years ago!)
      • The author makes a case that the SLA were a bunch of incompetent revolutionaries and that they had no real plan much less the ability to brainwash someone.
      • Patricia is presented as practical and willing to do what she needed to do to survive and that meant taking on their views and joining in. It also points out that once she was in jail and in contact with her family again she reverted easily to her heiress personality.
      • She had multiple chances to escape and chose not to. Her strained relationship with her mother, a proper Southern belle, and Patricia's own rebellious nature (she was only 19) made it easier for her to turn against her family.
    • She was convicted and served 22 months in prison before having her sentence commuted by President Carter.
      • Ironically, the Jim Jones People's Temple suicides made it easier to believe Patricia had been coerced. John Wayne himself, no fan of the counterculture, commented that if one man could coerce over 900 people to commit suicide then why couldn't people believe that "one little girl" was brainwashed?
      • She was also eventually pardoned of her crimes as well.
    • While reading this book I realized that the 1970s really were a terrible decade. I thought the 1960s were awful --- assassinations and riots and whatnot --- but looking back as an adult, I can see nothing very great about the 1970s.
      • The Vietnam War came to an end but the president (and vice-president) resigned in disgrace. The energy crisis occurred and caused the Middle East to become more of a focus for the U.S. government, something that would NOT pay dividends in the future. American cities were at their lowest ebbs thanks to a number of reasons. It was the "golden age" of hijacking.
      • Culturally, this was not our finest decade either. Clothing and hairstyles were probably their least attractive: peasant blouses, velour and satin fabrics, feathered hair, jumpsuits, tube tops, platform shoes and so much more.
    • Back to the book, the author offers context for the environment in which groups like the SLA formed and briefly thrived.
    • I enjoyed the book and finished it in two days. Recommended for those who like American history, lived through the 1970s, and have an interest in radical revolutionaries.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

  • THE BOOK
    • Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi
    • Published June 7, 2016
    • Debut novel of the author

  • THE PREMISE
    • The story begins in the late 1700s in Ghana, Africa. Two half-sisters (they share a mother) are born in different villages.
      • Ghana became an independent country in 1957, after centuries of colonialism.
    • The older sister, Effia, is given in marriage to an English man who is involved in the slave trade on the coast, living at the Cape Coast Castle which has dungeons beneath it to hold slaves on their way to the Americas.
    • Her half-sister Esi is sold into slavery and is imprisoned in the Castle even as Effia lives there with her husband. The sisters never meet each other or even know of the other's existence.
    • Effia's progeny remain in Africa and are active in the slave trade, working with the colonial population and the birth of Ghana as a nation.
    • Esi and her progeny are destined to be slaves in the United States for several generations. Then the family needs to adjust to post-slavery and the racism that continues for several more generations before the story comes to the present day.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • "Homegoing" is a term for an African-American funeral tradition, where the deceased is presumed to have returned to God. Thus the title has multiple meanings.
    • Years ago I read Roots by Arthur Haley and was disappointed that some characters disappeared from the narrative and you didn't know what happened to them as the story moved on to the next generations.
      • Then I realized that that might be precisely the point: the people sold into slavery never knew what happened back in Africa (and vice versa). Their family members could be sold and forcibly separated and would have lost their children or spouses at the owners' whims. They NEVER KNEW what happened to their children or other family members once they were gone. 
    • I loved this book. The characters were well drawn and you feel for them as they endure circumstances that no human being should have ever had to go through.
      • Even the African side of the family suffered and needed to make hard choices. Some were involved with the slave trade, acquiring the bodies needed to keep that industry going via internecine warfare. No one was safe from the specter of being sold into slavery if their village ended up on the wrong side of a battle.
      • One  doesn't often get a perspective from the African side of the slave trade.
    • One interesting thing I learn about the Akan people of Ghana is their use of "day names" for their children.
      • Boys (general meaning in parentheses)
        • Sunday: Kwasi (universe)
        • Monday: Kwadwo (or Cudjoe or Kojo) (peace)
        • Tuesday: Kwabena (ocean)
        • Wednesday: Kwaku (spider, the form of the god of all stories)
        • Thursday: Yaw (earth)
        • Friday: Kofi (fertility)
        • Saturday: Kwame (god)
      • Girls
        • Sunday: Akosua (universe)
        • Monday: Adwoa (peace)
        • Tuesday: Aabenaa (ocean)
        • Wednesday: Wukuo (spider, the form of the god of all stories)
        • Thursday: Yaa (earth)
        • Friday: Afua (fertility)
        • Saturday: Amma (god)
      • There are variations of these names too, such as Cudjoe for Kwadwo. 
        • Esi is a variant of Akosua.
        • Effia is a variant of Afua.
      • The author of the book, Yaa, has the name for a girl born on Thursday.
      • There are also names for birth order or children born under special circumstances (e.g. premature or during war)
      • Check out this Wikipedia article if you want to learn more about the naming conventions of the Akan people. 
    • I am always stunned at how such a thing as slavery existed. It's such a brutal thing to have occurred and it carries over into the present day as many people of African descent in America still face repercussions via racism, both overt and not.
    • Recommended for those who enjoy family sagas and historical fiction, or those interested in stories of Africa and/or slavery in America.

Saturday, September 3, 2016

The Gene by Siddhartha Mukherjee

  • THE BOOK
    • The Gene: An Intimate History by Siddhartha Mukherjee
    • Published May 17, 2016
    • The author also wrote The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, which I have read

  • THE PREMISE
    • Going back to the ancient Greeks and their ideas on heredity this book covers the history of the gene, even before it was "discovered" in the 20th Century.
    • The father of modern genetics is the obscure Czech monk Gregor Mendel and his experiments on pea plants. He did not know what a gene was, of course, but he figured out that children inherit traits from each parent that could be passed on to future generations.
      • He crossed yellow pea plants with green pea plants. Every plant in the second generation was yellow (because yellow is dominant and green is recessive). When the second generation plants were crossed with each other then (on average) a fourth of the plants were green, even though all the parent plants were yellow. 
        • This proved that the all yellow second generation plants still carried the green trait (the gene) to be able to produce green third generation plants.
      • Darwin's ideas on inheritance are covered as well. He never knew of Mendel's work and if he had then the study and understanding of genetics might have gotten a better head start.
    • Eugenics, the philosophy and practice to create better humans, began and gained acceptance in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. (The Nazis were fans and used eugenics principles to create laws in the 1930s.)
    • There's an in-depth look at the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA.
    • The author uses examples from his own family (hereditary schizophrenia) which adds a personal touch to the topic.

  • MY THOUGHTS
    • I enjoyed this book, especially the history of Mendel and Darwin and all the men (and a few women) who came after them.
    • My complaint would be that, instead of a photo section (I know what Darwin looked like and his photo adds nothing to my understanding of genetics), there should have been a few more diagrams. 
      • It has been a few decades since I took biology and I have forgotten exactly how things look in a cell.
      • I get that DNA is in the cell and I understand how the double helix splits apart to make an identical copy of itself before the cell divides into two identical copies. But where, exactly, are the genes and chromosomes located?
      • I think he explains it in the writing but personally I need more visual aids!
    • Because my husband's family has a case of an inherited disease moving through the generations, I read with interest the future of genetics. Will there be a day when gene therapy --- replacing the "bad" gene with a good copy --- can cure those with inherited diseases?
      • For my son's, nieces' and nephews' sake, I sure hope so.
    • Recommended for those who like reading about biology topics.